Wednesday, January 4, 2012

Connecticut Immigrants: Luxembourgers

Wondering what I'm talking about? You're probably not alone. We all know the groups that immigrated to Connecticut en masse: Irish, Italian, and Polish are probably among the most familiar. Yet, migrants from other countries have also called Connecticut home.
Immigrating around the same time as the Irish - and also driven by famine and the instability of life in Europe - some immigrants from Luxembourg found their way to the Meriden area. Their numbers were never large. Drawn by farm land, most immigrants chose to settle in the Midwest. Those who remained in Connecticut may have mixed with the local German population, as they shared a common language.
If your "German family" came from Meriden, who knows? You may in fact be Luxembourger.


For more information:
http://luxamculturalsociety.org/

Sources:
“19th Century,” Institut Grand-Ducal, Section de linguistique, d'ethnologie et d'onomastique (http://www.institutgrandducal.lu/Joomla/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=128&Itemid=239: accessed 20 April 2011).

Suzanne L. Bunkers, “Reflections of Luxemburg in the Rural Midwestern United States,” Reflections of Luxembourg in the U.S. (http://www.intech.mscu.edu/bunkers/reflections_of_luxembourg_in_the_u_s.htm accessed 13 April 2011).

Octavie Modert, speech given at the Annual Cultural Conference, New Luxembourg, Wisconsin, 6 August 2010; transcript published by the Ministère de la Culture, de l’Enseignement Supérieur et de la Recherche, Ouverture d’esprit (http://www.mcesr.public.lu : accessed 14 April 2011).

“The Luxembourgers in America,” The Library of Congress, European Reading Room (http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/imlu/luxem.hmtl: 17 April 2011).

"Getting Started,” The Luxembourg American Cultural Society (http://www.luxamculturalsociety.org/links.html#geneology_research: accessed 20 April 2011).

“Luxembourg Settlements,” Institut Grand-Ducal, Section de linguistique, d'ethnologie et d'onomastique (http://www.institutgrandducal.lu/Joomla/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=128&Itemid=239: accessed 20 April 2011).

“19th Century,” Institut Grand-Ducal, Section de linguistique, d'ethnologie et d'onomastique (http://www.institutgrandducal.lu/Joomla/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=128&Itemid=239: accessed 20 April 2011).

Dick Witry, “Luxembourg Brotherhood of America,” Luxembourg Brotherhood of America (http://www.luxam.info/LBA.html: accessed 20 April 2011). “The Luxembourgers in America.”

“Links,” The Luxembourg American Cultural Society (http://www.luxamculturalsociety.org/links.html#geneology_research: accessed 20 April 2011).

Information and Press Service of the Luxembourg Government, ed. “About….History of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg,” Government of Luxembourg, Informations et actualités du gouvernement luxembourgeois (http://www.gouvernement.lu: accessed 17 April 2011).

George McDonald, Frommer’s Belgium, Holland & Luxembourg, 10th Edition (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2007), 506.

(And my apologies for the improper citation... “Luxembourgers in the New World” – Two Volume Set – Nicholas Gonnor translation and index by Jean Ensch, Jean-Claude Muller, Robert E. Owen)


2 comments:

  1. Thank you for posting these great resources! My Luxembourgers went to the Midwest, but your Connecticut blog has provided some great further reading. Off to explore now...

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  2. Happy research. Don't forget to check with their local historical society in the Midwest. Many of the Luxembourgers settled in large communities.

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