Friday, February 24, 2012

Follow Friday: Why Become a Genealogist?

   The post of February 18th on One Rhode Island Family really struck a chord with me. Diane wrote about why she chose to become a genealogist and wondered why some of us know so much about our family and others don't. According to her categories, I was one of those "genealogists by birth." A family member imparted on me the idea that it was my responsibility to know my family's history. She also passed down a family tree extending back to the Mayflower. It missed the wives' families but gave me a starting point - and a love for research.
    What about you? Why did you become a genealogist?

7 comments:

  1. I did not know what a genealogist was. I did not know it was something you could research. I had never read a family history. But I did grow up with family stories. My maternal grandmother told wonderful stories of growing up in New York City. Five Irish sisters had wonderful adventures in the early 1900s. I wanted to learn more. I came across a children's genealogy book which led me to more books, libraries, reels of microfilm,... I feel a connection to my grandmother when I learn more. In April I am taking my first trip to Ireland. Colleen

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  2. I am not currently a genealogist, but would love to make a living doing something associated with genealogy. I'm currently an IT professional.

    Regards, Jim

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  3. When my cousin was having her first child in 2000, I wanted to learn more about old family names. This is what prompted me to check into genealogy research and once I did I was instantly hooked. It's been such a fun and enriching hobby. I've learned more than I could ever imagine about my ancestors, met so many nice people in the genealogy community as well as distant cousins and located treasured family photos through connecting with others. Genealogy research has helped me feel very connected to my ancestors by learning more about their lives and the times in which they lived. It's been a wonderful experience for me.

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  4. Hi, I didn't see your email, so I'm writing here. In response to yesterday's post abt. NEHGS and their updating the Barbour Collection, I see you removed the post. I was going to tell you that the "Updated collection" consists of an old collection. And, the new blue small books, available on Ancestry are the newer. I think some people might be misled in thinking it's a new collection. I wrote all about the two books in my blog post, if you care to see it at Life From The Roots. http://lifefromtheroots.blogspot.com/2010/02/surname-saturday-farnham-and.html Thanks.

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  5. Barbara, that post was intended to be published on Saturday and will be (I write several days' worth of posts at a time and released one too early). They're actually two different transcriptions of the same basic collection - and NEHGS has some search perks that Ancestry doesn't. Please feel free to copy your comment to Saturday's post.

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  6. Thank so much, Bryna, it certainly has been an interesting discussion. People have given me many good reasons why their ancestors didn't keep track, unfortunately my ancestors had none of those, they were basically happy, middle class people who were just oblivious! And yet, I suspect my ancestors are now happy to be "found" and, to the extent I am able, be known by the generations to come. I do have some hope of interesting one of my daughters in the hunt, so perhaps I can be to her what your relative was to you.

    I follow your blog with great interest since I also research some SE Conn. roots. thanks again.

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